Talk, “Curatorial Practice and the Art of the African Diaspora”

Tuesday, February 21, 2012
6:00-8:30 pm
Milbank 323
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Curator and Art Historian Mora Beauchamp-Byrd will discuss contemporary curatorial practice and theoretical ideas shaping art of the African diaspora.  She will present images from the exhibitions she has curated dealing with Black British and Afro-Caribbean art.

About the Speaker:

Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd is a curator and art historian. She is Assistant Professor of Art History, Department of Art, and Curator of University Art Collections at Xavier University of Louisiana. Prior to that position, she was Assistant Professor of Museum Studies at Southern University at New Orleans. From 2005-2007, she was Assistant Director for Mellon Initiatives in the Research and Academic Program (RAP) at The Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, MA. From 1999 through 2001, she was Director and Curator of the Visual Arts Department at the Amistad Research Center, Tulane University in New Orleans, La.

Prof. Beauchamp-Byrd has a wealth of experience within the curatorial and administrative departments of numerous cultural institutions including The Caribbean Cultural Center (NY), where she was Curator and Director of Special Projects; the Bronx Museum of the Arts; The Studio Museum in Harlem (NY); the Museum of the City of New York, and The Drawing Center (NY).  Her numerous curatorial projects include Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996; Struggle and Serenity: The Visionary Art of Elizabeth Catlett; Transcending Silence: The Life and Poetic Legacy of Audre Lorde; When I Am Not Here/Estoy Alla: Photographs by Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons; Raised to the Trade: Creole Building Arts of New Orleans, and John T. Scott: Selections from the Fine Art Collections at Xavier University.

Beauchamp-Byrd received a B.A. in Art History and an M.A. in Visual Arts Administration from New York University.  She also holds an M.A. in Art History from Columbia University.  In 2011, she received a Ph.D. in Art History from Duke University in the Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies.

 

This is the first installment in the Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies (WGSS) and Africana Studies' Film and Speaker Series, Spring 2012 that is being offered as part of the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS) Critical Inquiry Lab's "Theorizing Diasporic Visuality", an innovative series of linked courses. This year’s lab links Prof. Tina Campt’s (Barnard Africana/Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies [WGSS]) Africana Studies colloquium, AFRS BC3110 Theorizing Diasporas, with May Joseph’s (Pratt Social Science and Cultural Studies) WGSS course, WMST BC3117 Film and Feminism.

Feb 21 2012 - 9:30am